Benefits of Tai Chi for Seniors

The benefits of Tai Chi in general cover all ages, but older people love this form of exercise for its low-impact, time-saving options. A twenty minute workout will present physical and spiritual results as it works on the body and mind as one fluid unit. It is an ancient Chinese martial art form that includes 19 movements with one pose to combine meditation with basic muscle improvements. Many retirees are practicing this art because it is low-impact and has many additional benefits. Tai chi classes are offered in many assisted living environments, with local instructors, and through local gyms, as more people realise the amazing benefits of this simple workout.

Focusing and Relieving

The breathing and movement combination helps focus the mind with the body while relieving stress from both entities. The deep breathing involved relaxes the muscles, expands oxygen intake, and helps the person focus on nothing but the movement. This helps the mind reset, centering thought around what works best for the body. This method has also been proven to help relieve arthritis pain through the slow stretching of the joints. The senior benefits when breathing and stretching are paired with the mental imagery of the exercises for a complete workout. This workout is designed to build lean muscle, rather than larger muscle mass.

Keeping the Mind Sharp

While continuous learning is essential for brain function, this form of exercise assists in keeping up mental facilities. Oxygen supply is increased, supporting brain function, and the meditation helps the brain focus on areas other than logical thought. The senior exercises different parts of the brain during tai chi, which helps the brain stay active and in a continuous state of flux. This helps reduce the amount of brain lost through the aging process, and may help slow the onset of certain brain issues.

Helping the Skeleton and Cardio System

As mentioned, this exercise relieves arthritis. It also helps ward off osteoporosis and its symptoms, as well as speeding recovery after strokes or heart attacks. The slow movements push the blood through the veins at an even pace, helping previously weak muscles improve over time. The bones move slowly, moving calcium through the system and helping to improve their overall structure. The lower leg bones strengthen their bond with the muscles, helping to reduce falls and increase balance. The exercises help relieve some symptoms of Parkinson’s and multiple sclerosis, as the movements work most muscle groups throughout the body.

 

Thank you to Jane Sandwood for the great post